@KILIMANJARO MUSIC AWARDS 2014- ALL YOUR VOTES TO FID Q A.K.A FAREED KUBANDA, VOTE HIM AS A BEST HIP HOP ARTIST OF THE YEAR. TO VOTE WRITE BC1 SEND IT TO 15440.

SMS BT4 TO 15440 TO VOTE FID Q AS A BEST HIP HOP SONG WRITER.

PIECE OF PEACE WITH HON. JANUARY MAKAMBA

In May 2006, President Kikwete made his first visit to the United States as President of Tanzania. He had a busy program, including invitation for a lunch with a select group of United States Senators. The lunch took place at the Senate Dining Room, billed as exclusive wheeling-and-dealing spot where the actual Senate business takes place.The President was asked to bring along two people for the lunch. He brought along Hon. John Cheyo, a Parliamentarian and the then Chairman of Public Accounts Committee, who was part of the delegation. He then asked me to come along – to take notes and coordinate follow-up to the meeting, if that becomes necessary.

The Senators sent one of their own to receive the President outside on arrival and escort us to the dining room. This Senator had a certain aura and bouncy, confident walk. He chatted-up the President as we walked through the corridor to the dining room.The dining room was not as auspicious as I had imagined. It was busy and informal, with people eating and chatting as we walked through to our table. As a student of American politics, I recognized many faces.

At our table, there were five or six Senators including Russell Feingold from Wisconsin, who had interest in human rights and Great Lakes region of Africa; Senator Thad Cochran, who was the host, from Mississippi, back then Chairman of the powerful Senate Appropriation Committee; Senator Richard Lugar from Indiana, a statesman who was then Chairman of Senate Foreign Relations Committee; Senator Dick Durbin, from Illinois. Many others passed by our table to say hello as the lunch proceeded.I had soup only as I had to keep up taking notes as the principals conversed. The Senator who sat next to me, the one who came to pick us up outside, insisted that I should order lunch. I summoned enough confidence to joke that a better lunch is waiting for me somewhere in town. He got the joke.

The Senators sought the President’s advice and insight on many issues in Africa.  The President was extremely eloquent about his vision for Tanzania and many issues on Africa and the kind of partnership that we can pursue. I believe that the outcome of the lunch contributed to the new dawn in the United States –Tanzania relations, which has been lukewarm for many years (no USA President had visited Tanzania before, except Clinton briefly in Arusha to support Mandela’s effort on Burundi peace process).
The lesson I came away with was that in other democracies, people elect extremely accomplished and intelligent people as their representatives (performance and honesty is a different debate). People who go into politics are those who have gone through the intellectual rigour that top schools (Yale, Harvard, Princeton, etc.) or the discipline that military service, provides. They don't always succeed but Americans at least attempt to assemble the best amongst themselves as their leaders. A smart and successful Prosecutor, for instance, is prodded to go into politics.


 What was interesting about this lunch was how much leaders (not just Presidents) in other countries are curious about the world and how it operates. We have [TV] stars in our Parliament, and are local celebrities, but it is critically important that they are curious and attempt to understand how this new brave world work and what are new dynamics shaping the future. The Senators we had lunch with engaged us abstractly and intellectually and also on bread-and-butter issues.
lunch concluded with Senators confident that they have found a new friend in President Kikwete and all promised to keep in touch and keep engaged (my first task after lunch back at the hotel was to draft for the President thank-you letters to each Senator).

Nine months later, in February 2007, the Senator who picked us up and escorted us to lunch, who prodded me to order lunch, who talked less at the lunch, was on TV announcing that he is running for President of the United States. Against all odds, with only three years in the Senate, he would go on to become the President.


** January Makamba **

HAPPY BIRTHDAY APRIL CHARLES IGOGO -I TRULY RESPECT YOU BROTHER->> HAVE A BLAST!!!


Y’ALL VOTE FOR MENINAH TO LET HER WIN THE BEST UPCOMING ARTIST @ THE 2014 KILI MUSIC AWARDS. TO VOTE SMS BD5 SEND IT TO 15440


WITH POWERFUL VOCALS AND HER TRUE LIFE LYRICS AND SING ALONG MELODIES,TANZANIAN BORN AND AFRICA’S MOST SENSATIONAL DIVA’S LADY JAY DEE ON THE OFFICIAL FIFA WORLD CUP 2014 ANTHEM

 The official FIFA World Cup 2014 anthem has been released by Coca-Cola ahead of this summer’s tournament, with a clear sounds from WAJE- NIGERIA, David Corey –South American, MI-NIGERIA, OCTOPIZZO- KENYA, LADY JAYDEE- TANZANIA, FALLY IPUPA- DRC, LILLIAN MBABAZI – UGANDA

Sensational multi-award winning R&B Afro Pop diva Lady Jaydee,>>> I call her Wallet, Mamaa Some Food a.k.a Judith Wambura Habash.>>She Started her Career at the young age of 7, singing in church. In the mid 1990s she formed a member of the group - Afro Reign. But it was not until 2001 when she released her first solo album titled ‘Machozi’ which crowned her Tanzanian Best Female Artist in 2001. Lady Jaydee continues to win numerous awards in and out of Tanzania including the Channel O Video Music Awards Best African East 2003, for her video ‘Machozi’ , in 2005 for ‘Distance’ and Best Collaboration Video with Titi from Uganda for her video ‘Makini’. Lady Jaydee is quite versatile in her music and in addition of performing in Swahili as her primary language, Jaydee has songs that incorporate English, French, Lingala, Zulu and others. She blends rich, soulful African vocals with arrangements and instrumentation blending both African traditional and modern influences. Some of her notable international collaborations include Samba Mapangala from Congo, Chameleone, Mad Ice and Ngoni from Uganda and Mina Nawe from South Africa.

In May 2001 she released her debut album titled ‘Machozi’ and in 2001 was awarded ‘Best Female Artist’ at the M-Net Tanzania Music awards. Lady Jaydee went on to win The Tanzania Music award Best Female Vocalist 2002 and the Tanzania Music Award Video of the Year for ‘Machozi’ during the same year. In addition during the same year she performed at the Kora All Africa Designers competition in Sun City and in May 2003 Released her second album titled ‘Binti’.

Lady Jaydee received the Tanzania Youth Achievement Award for best R&B single ‘Usiusemee Moyo’ in 2003 and during the same year nominated for the ‘The Most Promising Artist in Africa’ at the Kora Music Awards 2003. She went on to win the award for the Best R&B Album at the 2004 Tanzania Music Awards. During December 2005 Lady Jaydee released her third album titled ‘Moto’ and during the same year won ‘Best Female Artist from Tanzania’ at the Uganda Pearl of Africa Music Awards as well as being nominated for ‘Best Female Artist from East Africa’ at the 2005 Kora Awards.

2006 she was awarded Best Female Artist from Tanzania at the Uganda Pearl of Africa Music awards from where Lady Jaydee went on to release her fourth album in June 2007 titled ‘Shukrani’, including the smash hit single ‘Siku hazigandi’ as well as ‘Nishike Mkono’ feat. Mad Ice and ‘Njaloand Nyimbo Zetu’. She topped a busy year off being awarded Best Female Artist from Tanzania at the 2007 Uganda Pearl of Africa Music awards and Best Female Vocalist / Artist at the 2007 Tanzania Kili Music Awards. In 2008 Lady Jaydee was the First Olympic torch bearer as an African Artist and that same year received a nomination as Best Female Artist from Tanzania at the Uganda Pearl of Africa Music awards and received the award for Best Collaboration Song at the Tanzania Kili Awards for ‘Anita’. Lady Jaydee keeps coming back with more and more for her many fans as one of Africa’s amazing contemporary Divas. 



This is not the first time Coca-Cola has used the FIFA World Cup to bring an up-and-coming artist to the global stage. A remix of K’NAAN’s “Wavin’ Flag” was used as the brand’s anthem for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa. The Somali rapper collaborated with international artists to record 30 multilingual versions of the song, which topped the iTunes charts in 18 countries and sold more than 2.5 million, downloads worldwide.
The song became a truly global hit, when it was chosen as Coca-Cola’s promotional anthem for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, hosted by South Africa. This amended international version with additional lyrics reached the top ten in more than twenty different charts around the world. The English version was released as “Wavin’ Flag (Celebration Mix)” by K’naan to differentiate it from the original Canadian hit or from the Canadian Haiti charity hit. The Spanish cover featuring David Bisbal became very popular. A version of the song featuring will.i.am and David Guetta was targeted for international markets. Many other bilingual and country-specific versions were released.
In 2012, K’naan published a children’s book, When I Get Older: The Story Behind Wavin’ Flag, about the song and its history
K’NAAN’s Wavin’ Flag was used throughout Coca‑Cola’s FIFA World Cup™ campaign, featuring on all TV adverts and played at events during the FIFA World Cup™ Trophy Tour by Coca‑Cola. The song broke into the top 10 on music charts in 11 countries, peaking at number one in China, Mexico, Germany, Canada, Austria, Switzerland and Luxembourg. Building on the success of this music collaboration, Coca‑Cola also launched a digital radio station, ‘Coca-Cola Celebration Radio’.


  

MARIJUANA AND MUSICIANS: ARE THEY COMPATIBLE? THIS BEGS THE QUESTION, THOUGH. DOES SMOKING KUSH IMPOROVE CREATIVITY WHILE SLOWING A PERSON DOWN @ THE SAME TIME? IT IS LIKELY A DIMISHED RETURN, POSSIBLY ICREASING A PERSON’S INNOVATION AND THEN LOSING ITS EFFECT AFTER LONG USES OF SMOKING

It is blatantly clear that many musicians and recording artists smoke weed while writing or recording new songs. They do so at home, in a recording studio, or any place where they feel comfortable jotting lyrics on paper. But they don’t just do it for recreational purposes. They do it for creativity. It is their duty as musicians to constantly put out songs that have the potential for commercial success.Upcoming famous artists are especially under pressure to prove their worth, or else they become long forgotten one-hit wonders. Therefore, musicians and recording artists resort to a joint to open their minds for creativity. But weed is known to slow people down. So is it really productive for our favorite artists to inhale?
Rumor says that the left hemisphere of the human brain will function with logic and analytics, and the right hemisphere is responsible for creative expressions. So when a singer consumes THC from the weed she bought from a street pharmacist (drug dealer), she may have indeed lowered her reasoning abilities. Marijuana doesn’t necessarily make a person more creative, but rather logic is diminished and the person can’t help but to rely on the right brain hemisphere. It is true that people sometimes overthink something and potentially bar themselves from innovation and breakthroughs. Therefore, weed is believed to lessen the influence of logical thinking to maintain a state of craftsmanship. Then again, this is all theoretical.
In today’s information/computer age, musicians may instead resort to a digital drug known as an “i-doser.” I-dosers are binaural audio sounds used as an alternative to getting high without the addict having to worry about dirty urine. I-dosers are most effective when listened to through headphones. A person will hear a sound in one headphone ear slightly different from that heard in the other, in which a stereophonic noise is created, affecting the person’s brain waves. You can find these binaural sounds on UTUBE- 
many lasting for an hour. 
WARNING: Listeners must set their headphone volume at a low level before listening to a binaural sound, then raise the volume afterwards

WHY DO CELEBRITIES HATE PAPARAZZI??

Because everything they do, even if they just go to the shops gets reported! They have not privacy! And they are constantly bagged. Paparazzi go over the top.. Paparazzi see celebs as people who don't really have feelings! As soon as someone becomes famous, paparazzi think immediately that it's ok to bag them and be in their business. It's so stupid and selfish, at least I think so… ( TANYA )


The take photographs of them, put them in trashy magazines and basically drag their names through the mud. Some deserve it but most celebrities aren't bad. 
Seiously a guy celebrity can't have a female friend (and vice-versa) without a magazine popping up saying "_____ & ______, are they dating???" (REHEMA)



Some of them act like they don't like them but 4real they wan't to be on that camera. They freakin actors they arrived on places where they know paparazzi are there then thats when they start acting like a douche. thats how they promote them selfs ..My opinion… ( FUVU KINYETE )


the paparazzi is always in somebody business . .yeah we get it that celebrities are big and famous and have all this money and nice houses and lots of cars . . but in reality the celebrities are normal people just like everybody else with problems of their own so i clearly think that the paparazzi should chill for a little bit and give the celebrities some room ! ( CHINYE )




They never have privacy because everything they do, everywhere they go, they a surrounded by cameras and everything they do is always public. Imagine going everywhere and can barley walk because paparazzi and in your way, hounding your car. Not only that, they sell pictures to magazines and they make a rumor that's not true which starts a scandal… (MIYEYE)

THE MOST AMAZING POSITIVE VIBES FROM SOME OF THE YOUNG FOLKS DOES IN BONGO -THAT WE HARDLY KNOW!!

WAKAZI- The Tanzanian Emcee Drops 2 new singles as part of his new ritual of dropping 2 songs at a time. Sexy Lady, produced by Lucci, features the Crooner Brian James, and Songstress Jokate Mwegelo and is a feel good jam for the ladies that guarantees you to hit the dancefloor,aiiiii. He first debuted this song during his Big Brother Africa performance late last year, and fans have been impatiently waiting to hear it again, LOL….

On the other hand, Sumu Ya Panya (My City) is a Dar es Salaam City Anthem, that is descriptive of what the city is about and props to its different locales. My City was Produced by Bano Stylez.

Wakazi - Sexy Lady ft Jokate & Brian James (Produced by Lucci)

 Wakazi - Sumu Ya Panya *My City* (Produced by Bano Stylez)

VOTE RAMA DEE ( THE BEST RNB SONG OF THE YEAR-KAMA HUWEZI FT LADY JAY DEE- SMS AK4 TO 15440 ) VOTE RAMA DEE- ( BEST SONG WRITER OF THE YEAR- SMS BP4 ) @ KILIMANJARO MUSIC AWARDS 2014!!

 ALL VOTES AK4 TO 15440 AND BP4 TO 15440 TO VOTE FOR RAMA DEE

INTRODUCING HERI MUZIKI-18 YEARS YOUNG BOY FROM AZANIA SECONDARY SCHOOL

 Gota Love his name,-Heri Muziki is the name. The boy is 18 years student form 5 @ Azania Secondary School in Tz .His upcoming and first single will be called NAKUKUMBUKAGA Produced by Mswaki and written by Barnaba.
Working under management since November, 2013. Was kicked out of Bongo Star Search top 50, he was reppin’ Arusha. He’s working with Ben Pol under the same Management.

THEO AND NHLANHLA, THE MAFIKIZOLO GUYS ARE IN TOWN Y’ALL

 SIYANIAMKHELA  KAKHULU-TANZANIA, WOZANI SIYOJABULA BAFWETU

ALL MY TZ PEEPS IN THE US OF A NEAR DALLAS, TEXAS THEN THIS EVENT SHOULD NOT BE MISSED. THE AFRIMMA AWARDS IS THE FIRST AFRICAN MUSIC AWARDS EVENT IN USA THAT CELEBRATES AFRICAN MUSIC AND OUR VERY OWN DIAMOND WILL BE THERE TOO!! THE EVENT IS ON JULY 26TH 2014 AND THERE WILL BE A SPECIAL PERFORMANCE BY T-PAIN ALONGSIDE AFRICAN GREATS-- # This event will not only celebrate the music of Africa, but celebrates the unique sounds, culture and artists that tell the stories of our continent as a whole” said Anderson Obiagwu, Founder of Afrimma.#

AFRICAN MUZIK MAGAZINE AWARDS (AFRIMMA) is the sole award ceremony in the Diaspora that caters to all musical genres including but not limited to: Afrobeats, Assiko, Bongo, Decale, Funana, Genge, Highlife, Hiplife, Kwaito, Lingala and Soukous.

African music is currently gaining global recognition at a rapid pace following this trend, AFRIMMA will create a platform that promotes the diversity of African music by bringing influential artists from different African countries for a night of celebration.

AFRIMMA’s vision is endorsed by some of the biggest African artists such as Fuse ODG (UK), Lira (South Africa), Tuface Idibia (Nigeria), Flavour Nabania (Nigeria), Miriam Chemmoss (Tanzania) , Avril (Kenya), Afro Mask (Ghana/ United Kingdom) , Nonini (Kenya), Chub Heightz (Botswana) and many more.





WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A COMMUNITY PULLS TOGETHER TO HELP ONE OF THEIR OWN? ( #- Kudos to Hoyce Temu for her outstanding support to our communities through her TV Program “Mimi na Tanzania” Yes, Hoyce Temu mobilized our fellow Tanzanians to contribute to the treatment of a Tanzanian boy, Hamis, who was suffering from unknown illness. Hoyce you are an inspiration and your heart reflects Tanzanian spirit. # )




STORY BY: ZAINUL MZIGE-MOBLOG
 Hamisi is a young Tanzanian boy who has suffered for a long time from Plexiform Neurofibromatosis, a disease which causes large and restricting tumors. Hamisi developed an enormous growth on his right leg which was incredibly heavy. Due to the weight he was unable to walk and had to crawl on all fours and drag his heavy leg behind him.  His leg which grew to a monstrous size, weighed the young boy down, preventing him from playing and enjoying a normal childhood.   

Hamisi grew up in Tanzania with his father. Despite the desire, his father was unable to afford the expensive healthcare to ease Hamisi’s suffering. But through the kindness of others the community rallied together and through their efforts they were able to raise enough money to send Hamisi for an operation which would change his life forever.
In February 2014 Hamisi and his father nervously boarded a plane bound for Coimbatore in Southern India. It was here that he was greeted by an expert team of plastic surgeons at Ganga Hospital who were about to change his life.
Hamisi underwent extensive surgery where the surgeons removed the entire leg below the knee which weighed a staggering 5kgs. They hoped that removing the weight would allow him to move freer and feel lighter; it will also help his father to carry him when he is unable to walk. People suffering from Plexiform Neurofibromatosis tend to heal slowly and there can be complications so doctors were concerned that he may not make a full recovery. Hamisi is obviously a fighter at heart and defied the odds and recovered quickly and the doctors were able to reAfter the operation Hamisi was fitted with prosthesis.  Special prosthesis was made exclusively for him; both for the amputated limb and special shoes for the other leg but then came the hardest part. For many days he was sent to a training centre where he had to learn to walk with a walker.  He needed very aggressive physiotherapy and walking training but doctors knew that they were pushed for time as he had a flight booked back to Tanzania after a couple of weeks. They worked overtime and fast to get him fit to walk and by the time he got on a plane he could take 30 steps with walker.move some more of the leg around the knee in On the 29th March 2014, Hamisi returned to Tanzania a changed boy. His father has been trained in his physiotherapy so he can continue to build his strength. Both father and son are overwhelmed and so happy with the outcome of the operation which has made both their lives so much easier. A few months ago Hamisi’s future looked bleak but now thanks to the help of many people he faces a brighter, freer, independent future.  

It just goes to show a little kindness can go a long way. 

APRIL 5TH 2014 MAFIKIZOLO LIVE IN BONGO-DAR ES SALAAM @ MLIMANI CITY CONFERENCE CENTER!! AN EVENT LIKE NO OTHER! PLAY HOUSE IN MY HOUSE, WITH SPECIAL GUEST PERFORMANCE TO BE ANNOUNCED LATER!! UR FAV RESIDENT SOULFUL, DEEP AND AFRO HOUSE DJ’S HARRY MAG, DJ SOULFUL AND H THE DJ.

This is a Kwaito, Soulful, Deep and Afro House event with LIVE performances by the internationally recognized Mafikizolo in Dar es salaam on the 5th of April 2014...accompanying Mafikizolo's LIVE performance will be local artists and your favourite Resident Soulful House DJ's 'DJ Soulful' 'Harry Mag' and the one and only 'H the DJ' Location of venue and Ticket availability will be made shortly.....Real Music Comes From Real People

KILI MUSIC AWARDS 2014?!! #SONG OF THE YEAR # Y’ALL VOTE FOR JOTO HASIRA- AA2 TO 15440- + VOTE YAHAYA AA4 TO 15440- # AFRO POP VOTE JOTO HASIRA- WRITE AF2 THEN SEND IT TO 15440- VOTE LADY JAY DEE A.K.A JUDITH WAMBURA HABASH- BEST FEMALE ARTIST OF THE YEAR!!!! Tchaoo

  R& B/Zouk/Kwaito singer from United Republic of BONGO. She was voted Best
Tanzanian Female R&B Artist in 2002, performed at the Kora All Africa Designers Competition, and was awarded "Best R&B Album" at the Tanzania Music Awards on August 6, 2004. In July 2005, she won an award for "Best Female video for South Africa". She was among the first females to sing R&B in Swahili…..Vote>>> >>>
SWAHILI VERSION

PICS OF THE DAY WITH YOUNG AND HOTTEST TZ HAMISA HASSAN MOBETO, MODEL, ACTRESS AND VIDEO VIXEN Aiii!!


AS SOMEONE WHO BLOGS ON A SOMEWHAT REGULAR BASIS IN DIFFERENT OUTLETS, I’VE DISCOVERED SOMETHING RATHER DISTURBING ABOUT MYSELF- Y’ALL KEEP YOUR HEAD UP >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>!!!!!>>>>

As someone who blogs on a somewhat regular basis in different outlets, I have discovered something rather disturbing about myself. Whenever I am trying to think of something to write about, I find that I am more naturally drawn towards the critique. Not necessarily negative, but probably mostly so. As I think about it I have come to find a simple reason for this: the critique is easy. The nature of our world and of humans in general is that it is a very flawed place, and its inhabitants even more so. There is no end of things to critique, and thus an endless supply of things to take to task. For the writer this usually makes for easy pickings, and most of the time it's pretty fun too!

More positive writing, on the other hand, takes a great deal more effort. To be sure, a good critique takes effort as well, but it is far easier to find a subject to critique than it is to find a subject to write about positively. When it comes to design- especially design within the church market- it is extraordinarily difficult to write nice things as a matter of course. Those of us who are in the thick of it know the flaws and failings and ridiculous things that happen within our church's communication strategies, and venting through our writing is not only easy but also incredibly cathartic. I find myself falling into this constant pattern of tending towards the negative and the critique, and while I hopefully make valid points from time to time, I also recognize that I usually fail to offer encouragement except in very oblique ways. No doubt (and here I am in full-on confession mode) much of this stems from my own frustrations which cannot help but seep into the things that I write. But as I come out of an extremely busy and frustrating month, I decided that sometimes we (read: I) need a reminder of why we do what we do, and to celebrate the good that can be and is being done.

Speaking for myself, there are many times when I feel like most of the things I create have absolutely no purpose or meaning. Many times I can feel more like a Photoshop monkey than an artist, especially when deadlines pile up and I find myself having to sacrifice the things I would want to do simply to get something out the door. In those seasons it can difficult to make the ministry more than a job.But even the little things that we do can have a big impact; the problem is that we too often evaluate success in merely worldly terms. Along with that, we can begin to think that our efforts alone are what changes lives, rather than working in the faith that the Holy Spirit is always at work through (and often in spite of!) the things that we do. This realization is absolutely freeing, for we can let go of our illusion of control and self-importance to recognize that we are servants of God, trying our best to do his will in everything that we do.

 SO WHETHER YOU EAT OR DRINK OR WHATEVER YOU DO, DO IT ALL FOR THE GLORY OF GOD.

Because everything we do can be done for the glory of God, there are no longer any important things. We each have a gift that has been given to us by God, and we have the privilege and the responsibility to use it as best as we can. In the parable of the talents we read of how it is only those who make use of what they are given through hard work and some risk who are praised by the master; the ones who play it safe have what little they have taken away from them. Sometimes we have to be faithful in the little things before we can on to greater; the same parable makes this principle clear. Part of the discipline of being a disciple is to become less so that Jesus can become more, and as we are faithful in what God sends our way he will give us the opportunity to be faithful in more.
This is, of course not meant to be some sort of spiritual ladder-climbing analogous to the corporate world; rather, there is an inverse effect at work; as Jesus says, the first will be last and the last will be first.

The point of all this is that through all of the frustration and tight deadlines and creative tensions that inevitably crop up we need to have a fundamentally optimistic outlook. I do not mean some sort of naiveté that tries to find happiness in everything, but rather a deep-seated trust that in everything that we do, no matter how great or how small, we are doing it for the glory of God. There can be no greater calling than to serve God, and for those of us in the ministry-related creative fields that is our particular calling and one place in which it can happen.

At the end of the day the one who trusts God and does all for the glory of God can hold his or her head up high, fulfilled in knowing that whatever has been done, it is not something that is primarily self-serving or even done for some temporal good, but has eternal significance because it is trying to find itself within God's will.


There is no better place to be.

PREPARATIONS FOR THE ETHNOMUSICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM 2014 @ THE UNIVERSITY OF DAR ES SALAAM FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT (FPAD) ARE IN FULL SWING

By IMAN MANI - Tanzania Daily News
Organizers told the ‘Daily News’ that it is the eighth consecutive episode and are going to use the next four months to make sure it is better than the previous seven chapters.
“Symposium gatherings have become very much like a family meeting; a very open, friendly get-together where prominent scholars, students and the general public share ideas and skills related to the music traditions of Africa and music education,” Dr Kedmon Mapana, one of the two co-ordinators said.
He explained that as in the past this year’s episode will bring scholars, students, musicians and the general public together for sharing their interests in the music traditions of Africa. Emphasis will be on the eastern, central, west and southern sections of the continent together with the Diaspora.
There will also be music education, which involves issues of enculturation, musical transmission and children’s musical cultures. The other co-ordinator, Mitchel Strumpf, said the big name, as “key lecturer” this year, will be the well know Nigerian ethnomusicologist, Prof Meki Nzewi, who is currently teaching at the University of Pretoria.
There will also be Dr Polo Vallejo from Spain, who will present a film he made on the music of the Wagogo ethnic group in Dodoma Region. As in previous episodes, Prof Gerhard Kubik is expected to be there with his kwela group from Malawi.
Strumpf made no secret of his pride knowing that in seven years the Symposium has managed to create space for both well-known and emerging scholars in the fields of ethnomusicology.
This year is no exception and will include research papers and music performances by Tanzania scholars and musicians, together with their counterparts from other parts of Africa and the world.

The countries represented include Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Nigeria, Germany, the United States of America, Norway, India, Japan, the United Kingdom, Spain and Tanzania.
Another thing that has excited both co-ordinators about this year’s episode is having the first Zanzibar International Music Education workshop connected to the symposium.
This will be held at the Dhow Countries Music Academy premises, in Stone Town, on the first two days of August.

Workshop participants will have the opportunity of sharing ideas related to methods and materials that best bring the previously “out-of-the-classroom learning” traditions into the realm of “classroom-learning”.

BRITISH SUPER MODEL NAOMI CAMPBELL COVERS THE APRIL 2014 ISSUE OF SHAPE MAGAZINE

British supermodel Naomi Campbell, 43, covers the April 2014 issue of Shape magazine. Campbell, who has covered hundreds of magazines in her illustrious career, is thrilled that Shape mag tapped her to grace the cover.

“I’ve been on almost every magazine in existence, but this is my first time posing for Shape, and I’m thrilled. Of course,” she said. “I wish I had done it when I was younger, but it’s an honor to be here at any age.” Campbell, who turns 44 on May 22, says she drinks copious amounts of green juice (juiced green vegetables) to stay in shape, and she’s also a devoted Yogi.

( JAY Z THROWS CLASSY SHADE @ DRAKE AND SHOUTS OUT LUPITA NGYONG’O ) EARLY THIS MORNING, JAY ELECTRONICA SHOOK THE INTERNET UP BY DROPPING A FREESTYLE TRACK TITLED ‘WE MADE IT, THAT FEATURED A FEW BARS FROM JAY Z AND ITS EVIDENT THAT JIGGA DOESN’T LET TOO MANY SNEAK DISSES GO UNADDRESSED, LOL!!! WHAT’S A LITTLE FRIENDLY COMPETITION…

Last month, during Drake’s controversial interview with Rolling Stone, he told the magazine that he had a real interest in art, while making this statement about Jay Z:
It’s like Hov can’t drop bars these days without at least four art references. I would love to collect [art] at some point, but I think the whole Rap/art world thing is getting kind of corny.
Of course, Jay has a response to that. In the freestyle, he raps:

Sorry Mr. Drizzy for so much art talk

Silly me, rappin’ ’bout sh-t that I really bought
While these rappers rap about guns that they ain’t shot
And a bunch of other silly sh-t that they ain’t got
[You can debate whether he addresses Drake as Mr. or Miss Drizzy but the real tea is that he shouted out a name, and we all know Jay don't ever address folks directly.]
On a positive tip, our girl Lupita got a shout out:

I’m on my Lupita Nyong’o

Stuntin’ on stage after 12 Years A Slave
This Ace of Spades look like an Oscar
Black tux, look like a mobster
N:B Lupita took the world by storm just under a month ago when she won herself and Africa an Oscar. And an academy award is no mean feat especially being the first African to win it in the essence of the very word.

IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO TRAVEL OR LIVE IN EAST AFRICA WITHOUT AT LEAST NOTICING KANGAS, IF NOT EVENTUALLY INCORPORATING THEM INTO YOUR DAILY LIFE. BUT UNLESS YOU UNDERSTAND DEEP SWAHILI, IT’S EASY TO MISS THE CLEVER AND CHARMING MAJINA (NAMES) OR METHALI (PROVERBS) INSCRIBED AT THE BOTTOM OF EACH KANGA CLOTH.



“Ya mahaba ndweo maradhi upeo.”
The intoxication of love is the ultimate disease. -Swahili proverb
Ever suffered from a broken heart? A jealous heart? A heart haunted by insecurity? An unrequited love? A heart obsessed with the impossible? Chances are there’s probably a perfect Swahili proverb inscribed on a dizzyingly gorgeous kanga cloth for you. Love and heartache are stitched into the fabric of everyday life through the ubiquitous kanga, that square-shaped cloth sold as doti (pairs) all over East Africa and worn by women and girls everywhere.

In fact, it’s the writing that makes the kanga unique, differentiating it from other vibrant textiles like the kitenge or kikoi.
Many kanga proverbs are known for their mafumbo (ambiguity), often leaving the reader puzzling over its multiple meanings as she wraps herself in its message. Kanga, usually exchanged as gifts between women, have the power to strengthen or destroy a relationship, depending on the particularities of meaning and context. That’s because the kanga says everything that can’t be said out loud.
In a culture that prides itself on extreme politeness and respect, the kanga confronts taboos that can’t be addressed – jealousy, sex, disappointment, luck, love, lies, passion, and death. The kanga is the ultimate public billboard for personal feelings.

Never out of fashion or season, thousand of kanga designs and messages are produced on a weekly basis, hailing from kanga factories as close by as Urafiki Textiles in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania or as far away as Chavda Textiles in Mumbai, India. Ranging in cotton-density quality and design creativity, kanga-buying always involves a careful consideration of text and image.
Sometimes you’ll find a potent message with a seemingly innocuous pattern, or a bombastic pattern with a bland message. Finding the right balance is part of the joy of kanga hunting. If you’re deep into Swahili culture, you’d never purchase the kanga for its design alone – the significance of the kanga lies in its poetry.  It was hard to choose because there are so many good ones and new designs appear weekly in the markets. I tried, then, to choose kangas that are equally compelling to read and wear.

IN ALL MY EXPERIENCES, THERE HAVE BEEN VERY FEW MUSICIANS WHOSE TALENTS EMBODY ALL WHAT A TRUE MUSICIAN SHOULD BE LIKE. AT A TIME WHEN THE MUSIC SCENE IS LITTERED WITH TOO MUCH BORROWING, ARTISTES RESORTING TO AUTO TUNING AND EYEBROWS RAISING, THERE IS ONE ARTISTE WHOSE MUSICAL STYLE AND DEPTH SETS HIM APART FROM THE MULTITUDE OF ARTISTES THE WORLD OVER. HE’S THAT ONE MUSICIAN. THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER, LOYISO'S CREATIVE IMPULSES HAVE BEEN INSPIRED BY A DEEPLY-HELD SPIRITUAL COMMITMENT TO IMPROVING THE WORLD THROUGH HIS MUSIC AND ACTIONS. WHILE MANY MUSICIANS FIT EASILY INTO A SINGLE CATEGORY, LOYISO'S UNIQUE MUSICAL VISION REMAINS UNCLASSIFIABLE.ONE OF AFRICA’S MOST SUCCESSFUL R&B ARTIST, I HAD THE PLEASURE OF INTERVIEWING THE SOUTH AFRICAN BORN MUSIC STAR LOYISO BALA


Seif Kabelele: When did you start singing and who inspired you to get into music?
Loyiso: I actually started singing when I was 3 years old and I remember being asked to come and sing on stage at church. While I was singing people were throwing money at me and I kept picking it up while I was still singing the song. It’s something I was born into and ended up loving.



Seif Kabelele: How has your family and upbringing shaped your singing career?
Loyiso: Since I started singing at such a young age and attended music school thereafter, it has taught me how to discipline myself whilst striving to become the best at what I do. And that has carried over into all areas of my life.

Seif Kabelele: What has been your most memorable experience as a musician to date?
Loyiso: I would sincerely have to say it was performing at 2010’ FIFA World Cup Kick-off celebration, right here in South Africa. Second to that would be performing @ the 46664 Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday dinner and concert in Hyde Park, London in 2008.

Seif Kabelele: How difficult has is it been trying to sell R&B or your style of music in South Africa?
Loyiso: When I started out, R&B was synonymous with American artists, so at first the South African audience didn’t take to a South African doing R&B easily. I think they felt that I wasn’t being myself. It took a few years for my music to win them over to my unique style of R&B and that is when the awards and platinum sales started. My style of music started out as pure R&B, however it has evolved to what is now classified as “Urban”, a fusion of contemporary R&B, soft rock and urban-styled pop
Seif Kabelele: Your Song, “Wrong For You” was written by Robin Thicke. How did you two hook up?
Loyiso:
Robin Thicke’s first album was produced by the same guy who I worked with on Wrong For You - Sundafu Kawah. So you can imagine how easy it was to have a song written by Robin Thicke on my album. Unfortunately I didn’t get to meet him in person and he kept canceling his trips to South of A.

Seif Kabelele: How are you managing as an independent artist?
Loyiso:
Individuals on the team have been delegated to fulfill a certain role that a functioning record label would be required to do, from label manager to sales to promotions to marketing and so on; I may be independent but I’m not alone in this at all. I still view this as a business and approach it as such.

Seif Kabelele: What are some of the challenges that you face as an independent artist?
Loyiso:
Being an independent artist forces me to keep on investing most of what I make back into my craft. Whether it’s studio equipment, music videos, taking a band to a promotional performance… the list is endless. You need to believe in yourself to do this because in this industry there are no guarantees.

Seif Kabelele: You have been around for over 14 years now. How have you grown over these years?
Loyiso:
I would say the key areas would be in terms of my music industry knowledge as a whole , and my confidence in my abilities as both a songwriter and artist, which has allowed me to ignore industry trends and focus on what is true to me and what I love doing. I have also improved tremendously as a performer over the past fourteen years and I’m older of course, and that brings with it new perspective. I’m grateful to God that how he raised me over these past fourteen years was not fast and fragile but slow and solid,lol
Seif Kabelele: Do you support any charity organisations?
Loyiso: Yes I do. I believe it is very important and that is just from my own personal experience. The reason that I am where I am today is because, way back then, a number of people were extremely charitable towards me when I needed it the most. And I will remain forever grateful to them. I was so inspired by their generosity that I also wanted to be a person who gives to others. So by working with charities, I feel that I am able to give back in whichever way I possibly can and it’s amazing and humbling to know that I am contributing towards improving others’ lives

Seif Kabelele: In  a 2008 interview with 46664.com, you stated that with all your success and accomplishments  over the years, this is no  doubt the greatest honor that  you have  received  was to be a part of such a prestigious event alongside the world’s most inspirational man, Nelson Mandela”. Could you tell the readers how you came to be selected as an ambassador for the 46664 campaign and the feeling performing live before a world audience at Hyde Park?
Loyiso: I was invited by the chairman of 46664 to an orphanage in 2007 (if I remember correctly) and a few days later I was called into a meeting to discuss me becoming an ambassador for the brand because of the way I apparently conducted myself during the visit a few days earlier. Performing before an audience of, what I believe was in the region of 50,000, was electrifying! I don’t think I can find the right words to describe it actually. But it was certainly an honor!